25/10/2014 18:32
Photo galleries

‘Natitude’ Brings Rare Unity to US Capital

It hasn’t come to a standstill. But business as usual in Washington DC, a buttoned-down city renowned for its uninterrupted political brawling, has been conspicuously disrupted this week as fans across the ideological spectrum unite behind the capital’s major league baseball team. The Washington Nationals are in postseason playoff contention for the World Series (the grandly-titled name of the annual professional baseball championship in the United States) and this week marked the first time in 79 years that a postseason major league baseball game was played in the US capital. The Nationals are affectionately known as the “Nats” and the fervent crescendo of enthusiasm for the team as “Natitude.” Tens of thousands of fans bedecked in the Nats’ signature red flocked to Washington’s new stadium to attend the game on Wednesday, many DC-area employers gave staff the afternoon off to watch the game on television and local government officials have even rescheduled the people’s business in order to “ignite their Natitude,” as the catch-phrase of the week in Washington would have it. Like winning sports teams, bipartisan unity is a rare commodity in Washington, especially on the eve of a presidential election. But the Nats’ improbable drive toward baseball’s championship in a sport often called “America’s pastime” has professional politicians and other local residents lining up as one in support of the hometown team, regardless of their political views.<br />Photo:Washington DC baseball fans take an afternoon off to watch the hometown baseball team in a rare post-season playoff game.<br />
Tags: Washington
It hasn’t come to a standstill. But business as usual in Washington DC, a buttoned-down city renowned for its uninterrupted political brawling, has been conspicuously disrupted this week as fans across the ideological spectrum unite behind the capital’s major league baseball team. The Washington Nationals are in postseason playoff contention for the World Series (the grandly-titled name of the annual professional baseball championship in the United States) and this week marked the first time in 79 years that a postseason major league baseball game was played in the US capital. The Nationals are affectionately known as the “Nats” and the fervent crescendo of enthusiasm for the team as “Natitude.” Tens of thousands of fans bedecked in the Nats’ signature red flocked to Washington’s new stadium to attend the game on Wednesday, many DC-area employers gave staff the afternoon off to watch the game on television and local government officials have even rescheduled the people’s business in order to “ignite their Natitude,” as the catch-phrase of the week in Washington would have it. Like winning sports teams, bipartisan unity is a rare commodity in Washington, especially on the eve of a presidential election. But the Nats’ improbable drive toward baseball’s championship in a sport often called “America’s pastime” has professional politicians and other local residents lining up as one in support of the hometown team, regardless of their political views.
Photo:Washington DC baseball fans take an afternoon off to watch the hometown baseball team in a rare post-season playoff game.



  • Add to blog
  • Send to friend
  • Share

Add to blog

You may place this material on your blog by copying the link.

Publication code:

Preview:

RIA Novosti‘Natitude’ Brings Rare Unity to US Capital‘Natitude’ Brings Rare Unity to US Capital

23:14 11/10/2012 Washington DC baseball fans of every age and political affiliation came out to support the Nationals on Wednesday as the hometown team played its first postseason major league baseball game in 79 years. The Nationals are playing the fourth game on Thursday in the best-of-five National League Division playoff series against the St. Louis Cardinals, which leads the series 2-1.>>

Send by e-mail

All fields are required!

Leave a comment
    Рейтинг@Mail.ru
    © 2014  RIA Novosti
    Some material may be inappropriate for those under 18